A Team USA Related to the first case of a person recovering from a wound caused by ‘M’. with chelonae ‘a Experimental treatment Booming It was published on Tuesday, May 3, 2022 by the newspaper El Pais.

In January 2020, a 56-year-old man visited a Boston hospital and complained of a skin rash that spread under his left arm.

Within a few months his condition became so critical that he had to be hospitalized without any applied treatment. The story of how he overcame this crisis is a new example of the potential of the virus to fight antibiotic-resistant superbugs, a global epidemic with no apparent solution every year. Kills more than AIDS, malaria and some tumors.

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria prey on people who are already weakened by other diseases or treatments. These patients লক্ষ millions worldwide রয়েছে are at risk of serious complications or even death from this infection.

Antibiotics are used

The man who arrived at Brigham Women’s Hospital in January 2020 was the perfect victim. He was suffering from chronic kidney disease and arthritis in his joints because he had problems with his immune system which also caused neurological complications.

As his condition did not improve, the doctors started treating him with antibiotics. None of the antimicrobials used can interact with the bacteria that cause the infection. It was about Mycobacterium chelonaTuberculosis is a pathogen in the family that can cause rashes and extensive damage to other organs.

After a year the infection spread and the boils became bigger and more painful. At that time, d Treatment Francisco M. Marty, of Venezuelan descent, advised his colleagues that perhaps a virus could cure the patient.

The virus saves the patient

The doctor referred Bacteriophage virus, Special pathogens for killing bacteria. For every known bacterium there is probably a virus that is capable of entering it and killing it. All doctors had to find the right pathogen.

Doctors extracted germs from a patient’s wound, sequenced their genomes, and searched within 20 previously studied phases to eliminate another superbug infection in the same family. This is how it was identified. MuddyLaboratory testing is a phase that eliminates without problems M. Chelona

Doctors were allowed to use the mud as an experimental treatment and injected it into the patient’s veins.

“This is the first time that phase therapy has been applied M. ChelonaLittle explanation. “Besides, this is the first case where results are achieved with a single virus; Cocktails of different phases are usually used, ”he added. In this case the number of patients decreases, but adds an increasing number Those who have survived the infection With superbugs thanks for this experimental therapy.

The medical team did not identify him to protect the patient’s privacy, but did reveal images of the rapid evolution of his injuries after experimental treatment. Her case leaves an interesting unknown.

Francisco M. was a fan of the study. Marty, the Brigham physician who advised the first phases and who died on April 9, 2021 Falls from a hill During a holiday photo shoot in the Dominican Republic.

Superbug

Superbugs are a direct result of antibiotic abuse. Many bacteria have developed resistance to many or all known antibiotics as a result of indiscriminate use to prevent any kind of infection or to fatten cattle.

The goal now is to prevent the same thing from happening with phages. This is why “lytic” viruses are sought after, which penetrate the bacteria and literally break it down. It is important that they do not integrate their genomes with parts of bacterial DNA; Otherwise they could become a transmission vehicle of resistance, which would send us back to the starting square. In the fight against this worrying epidemic.

It may be congenital or it may be due to hormonal changes and obesity. But there is a main reason »https://bit.ly/376a3Ak

Someone sent something to the post office Trade On Friday, April 29, 2022





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